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From Infodemic to Information War

The VUB and EU DisinfoLab have joined forces under the EDMO Belux project to publish an investigation, “From Infodemic to Information War”, about the evolution and convergence of disinformative narratives around the Covid-19 pandemic and the war in Ukraine.

Research is a core part of what we do. It involves identifying, uncovering, and explaining disinformation campaigns and networks, using open source investigation techniques (OSINT) and social media network analysis methodologies. We disseminate our findings via our partnerships with the media and leading experts in the field.

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The VUB and EU DisinfoLab have joined forces under the EDMO Belux project to publish an investigation, “From Infodemic to Information War”, about the evolution and convergence of disinformative narratives around the Covid-19 pandemic and the war in Ukraine.
Ana Romero-Vicente, Researcher at EU DisinfoLab Executive Summary The study tackles a dozen disinformation websites to explore a fairly under-researched phenomenon on the rise in wake of the pandemic: requesting donations from readers in the form of cryptocurrencies.
During the 2021 German federal elections, satirical campaigns, set up by activists group, spread online and offline. When does satire become disinformation?
The last French presidential election five years ago was marked by the Macron Leaks and the spectacular dissemination of data. Even before the outbreak of the war in Ukraine, securing the 2022 presidential election was a priority, for state actors, civil society, and platforms alike.
This analysis provides a snapshot of common disinformation trends that have been spreading since the beginning of the conflict in Ukraine. All research is based on fact-checks published by networks such as #UkraineFacts and EDMO.
By Maria Giovanna Sessa, Senior Researcher at EU DisinfoLab Executive summary As the perception of expertise has now become a question of credibility over competence, the research identifies a three-fold typology of actors who, being publicly recognised as experts despite their lack of knowledge on COVID-19, consistently transmitted disinformation in Italy during the first year of the pandemic. 
Disinformation experts need effective complaint and redress mechanisms. How else will we be heard when social media platforms make mistakes?
By Roman Adamczyk, EU DisinfoLab Research Coordinator Disinformation is often perceived as a complex topic where malicious actors, mostly linked to states, use sophisticated techniques to spread misleading or false content to large audiences.
By Ana Romero-Vicente, EU DisinfoLab Researcher Introduction Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube have all taken additional steps to crack down on Covid-19 falsehoods, although it is proven that they are not always effective, and their AI detection system fails to remove most of the problematic content.
By Maria Giovanna Sessa, Research Coordinator at EU DisinfoLab The research focuses on the targets of COVID-19 disinformation during the pandemic in Italy between the start of 2020 and mid-2021.